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SKA Images

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SKA antennas – what will the SKA look like?

Take a look at how the two SKA sites in Australia and South Africa will look when the telescopes are complete! These images blend photos of real hardware already on the ground at both sites with artist’s impressions of the future SKA antennas. The day and night composites of the two sites combine all elements in South Africa and Australia. Credits: SKA Observatory.  


 
Prototypes on site

Antennas of the Aperture Array Verification System 2.0 (AAVS2.0), a demonstrator for SKA-Low at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Obervatory in Western Australia, with the Milky Way overhead

The Aperture Array Verification System 2.0 (AAVS2.0), a demonstrator for SKA-Low at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Obervatory in Western Australia. The full station uses 256 SKALA4.1-AL prototype antennas realised by INAF with the Italian industrial partner Sirio Antenne, a design that has successfully passed the SKA System Critical Design Review (CDR). (Credit: Michale Goh/ICRAR-Curtin)

Close up of the SKA's low-frequency prototype antennas

A close up of the SKA’s low-frequency prototype antennas, part of the Aperture Array Verification System constructed on site at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia. These are SKALA 4.1 antennas designed by the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) and manufactured in Italy. (Credit: ICRAR-Curtin)

 

 

 

 

A shot of the prototype SKA-MPI dish just missing its central section

The almost fully assembled SKA-MPI prototype dish on the South African site. SKA-MPI is funded by the Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy (MPIfR). In this image, the dish is missing its central panel and feed indexer. Credit: SARAO/Angus Flowers

SKA-MPI prototype dish on the South African site, with a clear blue sky behind it.

The SKA-MPI prototype dish on the South African site. SKA MPI is funded by the Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy (MPIfR), and is the first SKA prototype dish to be assembled on site. (Credit: SKAO)

 

 

 

 

 

SKA science – what will the SKA do?

Unless otherwise stated in the image caption, please credit images: SKA Organisation/Swinburne Astronomy Productions.